Carers Rights Day is a national campaign that brings organisations together to help carers in their local community know their rights and find out how to get the support they are entitled to.

Carers Rights Day 2018 takes place on Friday 30 November.

The theme for this year is Caring for Your Future.

Its aims are to:

  1. Make carers aware of their rights
  2. Let carers know where to get help and support
  3. Raise awareness of the needs of carers

How can YOU help carers? 

There are an estimated 65,000 unpaid carers in East Sussex, many of whom are not aware of their rights, or what support they are entitled to. You can help spread the word by sharing posters (see below), social media posts or join in our Carers Rights Day events - to be announced soon.

Join us at an event this Carers Rights Day:

Free Campaigning Workshop: Monday 26 November 2018

Gain skills to campaign and influence decision makers, and bring about the change you want to see for carers.

Living Well with Less Pain event on Wednesday 28 November

We'll be hosting an information stand on the week of Carers Rights Day at Uckfield Civic Centre, from 10am on Wednesday 28 November.

Win a car!

Pop by our stand in the Eastbourne Arndale Shopping Centre (which will soon be renamed 'The Beacon) on Carers Rights Day, Friday 30 November, 9am-5pm, to enter the prize draw raffle to win a Suzuki Celerio, donated by Eastbourne Suzuki/Eastbourne Motoring Centre. As well as the car as first prize in the raffle, 10 lucky people will also win £25 Marks & Spencer vouchers.

Raffle ticket proceeds go to local charities including Care for the Carers, so you'll be helping unpaid carers at the same time! 

Go Italian in Hastings

Carers in Hastings! Join us for lunch at The Italian Way on Carers Rights Day - Friday 30 November 2018, at 1pm.

Download posters to put up in your workplace or community

Please print out any of the templates below to share online, in your office, or put up on your community noticeboard, doctor's surgery or library. Every single poster helps raise awareness of unpaid carers. 

You can also take a photo of you and your group holding up the poster and tag us on social media (find us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook) using the hashtag #carersrightsday 

Did you know as an unpaid carer you are entitled to...?

  1. The right to take a ‘reasonable’ amount of time off work to deal with an emergency or an unforeseen matter involving a dependent (someone who depends on you for care). The time off is unpaid, unless your employer is willing to give paid time off as a contractual right.
  2. Have your views heard and taken into consideration by Adult Social Care when deciding how best to meet the needs of the person they care for. Comprehensive information and advice about care and support in their local area, including benefits advice.

    If you are a caring for someone, having the right information at the right time can make a huge difference. Care for the Carers can suggest things to consider for gathering together the right information in advance, for when you might need it, as well as how to access timely information.

    East Sussex County Council’s information booklet ‘Do you look after someone?’ describes the help available through their commissioned services if you look after an adult in an unpaid caring role. 
    Care for the Carers can also signpost you and make a referral to various organisations that can support you as an unpaid carer.

  3. Move between local authority areas and still receive the same level of support.
    The Care Act's 'Continuity of Care' information notes that carers should be supported if they need to move between local authority areas in England, without suffering a gap in the care they need when they arrive in the new area. ‘Continuity’ means making sure that, when an adult who is receiving care and support in one area of England moves home, they will continue to receive care on the day of their arrival in the new area. This means that there should be no gap in care and support when people choose to move. In any of these circumstances, the adult (or someone on their behalf) must tell the local authority where they plan to move (the ‘second authority’) of their intentions.

  4. Not be discriminated against on the basis of your association with a disabled person
    Examples might be if as a carer you were refused entry to a venue because you were with someone who is disabled - both the person with the disability and you would potentially have been discriminated against. Another example, is if an employer denies you promotion because of your caring role. For more information about your rights, contact Carers UK.

  5. Request flexible working
    All employees have the right to ask for flexible working after they have worked for the same employer for 26 weeks (six months), as long as they haven’t already made a flexible working request within the last 12 months. 
    Flexible working requests should be made in writing and should include details of the revised working pattern you are seeking, how you think this may affect your employer’s business and how you think this request can be dealt with. Employers must have a sound business reason for rejecting a request.

    NB If you're an employer reading this and are looking for information about how you can support your employees who are carers, please contact Employers for Carers for more information. Depending on the nature of your organisation, you might also wish to consider signing up to our Carers Card scheme.


  6. A carer’s assessment
    If you’re looking after someone who couldn’t manage without your help, you have a right to have your own needs assessed, even if the person you are looking after has had an assessment of their own. The assessment will look at the care you provide and how this affects your life. It will consider the things you want to achieve in your own day-to-day life, such as work, training, social activities and well-being. It must also consider other important issues including whether you are able or willing to carry on caring, and it will inform you about what services and support are available to you.

    Carers can complete an online assessment form or contact Adult Social Care direct. Care for the Carers can support you if you would like help with completing the assessment form.

  7. Young Carers (under 18 years of age) are entitled to a 'young carers' needs assessment' to decide what kind of help they and the family might need. The assessment must decide whether it is appropriate for the young person to care for someone else, and this includes taking into account whether they want to be a carer. Consideration must be given to education, training, leisure opportunities and the young person’s views about their future.

Guidelines for staff in hospital settings  

You can also see the Guidelines for the practice of involving carers and carers admission, which aim to help hospital staff to understand their role in involving carers with care and discharge planning for the people they care for. They also set out the steps staff should take when carers are admitted to hospital.

The Coming out of hospital online resource gives you information about your rights as a carer during the hospital discharge procedure, the steps that should be followed before the person you care for is discharged, and what you can do if things go wrong.

To find out more about the services unpaid carers are entitled to and to speak to a support worker, contact our Gateway service by calling 01323 738390, or by emailing [email protected].

Other useful resources about Carers Rights